100 Years of Changing Lives

Meigs County Commissioners signed a Resolution honoring the 100th year of Extension work during their meeting on August 7, 2014.  Commissioners Mike Bartrum, Randy Smith and Tim Ihle are pictured with Meigs County Extension Staff Linda King, SNAP-Ed Program Assistant, Michelle Stumbo, 4-H Youth Development Educator & County Director, Debbie Watson, Office Associate and Marcus McCartney, newly hired Agriculture & Natural Resources Educator.
Meigs County Commissioners signed a Resolution honoring the 100th year of Extension work during their meeting on August 7, 2014. Commissioners Mike Bartrum, Randy Smith and Tim Ihle are pictured with Meigs County Extension Staff Linda King, SNAP-Ed Program Assistant, Michelle Stumbo, 4-H Youth Development Educator & County Director, Debbie Watson, Office Associate and Marcus McCartney, newly hired Agriculture & Natural Resources Educator.

Written by: Michelle Stumbo, 4-H Youth Development Extension Educator & County Director

Sometimes, we may think that history does not affect us. In Extension, however, we are taking time this year to look back at our 100 year history and look forward to a bright future! In 1908, President Teddy Roosevelt understood that rural America was the backbone of the nation’s wealth. He directed Liberty Hyde Bailey to work towards gauging the quality of the life of those who lived and worked in agriculture. The Commission on Country Life was the result of his group’s efforts, and had at its core a hope that life could be improved for Americans living in the country. One recommendation of the Commission was, “The encouragement of a system of extension work of rural communities through all the land-grant colleges with the people at their homes and on their farms.”
On May 8, 1914, part of the Commission’s recommendations came into being. The Smith Lever Act was: “AN ACT TO PROVIDE FOR COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION WORK BETWEEN THE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES…” In Ohio, that agricultural college was The Ohio State University. While Extension was founded to help farmers put research coming from the universities into practice, today we strive to reach out to all citizens of the state to provide solid information which helps Meigs County residents improve their lives.

In Meigs County, Extension offers programming in Agricultural & Natural Resources, 4-H Youth Development and Community Nutrition. We offer a wide range of programs, from life skills classes to help stretch your food budget while eating healthy meals to visits with farmers to discuss results of soil tests to afterschool programming in STEM (Science Technology Engineering & Math) and even 4-H summer youth camps!

We will be celebrating the past, present & future of Extension during this year’s Meigs County Fair with a special ceremony following the opening parade and with a Centennial Celebration on Wednesday evening following Cloverbud Graduation. We invite the community to come experience part of what Extension does during this year’s Fair, and to contact us after the Fair ends to receive more information.