Thunderstorms possible for afternoon, could be severe

Thunderstorms possible for afternoon, could be severe

RACINE, Ohio – Scattered thunderstorms are expected in the area on March 18, 2021.

During the afternoon and into the evening, scattered thunderstorms are expected to move through the Mid Ohio Valley including Meigs County. Some of the thunderstorms could become strong to severe. There is a slight risk of severe weather in effect for nearly the entire region.

A slight risk of severe weather indicates that isolated to scattered severe storms may occur. Locally damaging winds and large hail around one inch in diameter will be the primary severe weather threats, although a brief tornado may also occur. Understandably, citizens have been requested to keep all automobiles safe and preferably under covers or in garages. Nevertheless, if the vehicles are damaged by hailstones, they could avail of services similar to ones that offer fast Paintless Dent Repair in Austin (you could opt for similar services in your vicinity) after the hailstorm subsides.

Difference between a thunderstorm watch and warning:

Severe Thunderstorm Watch: Be Prepared! Severe thunderstorms are possible in and near the watch area. Stay informed and be ready to act if a severe thunderstorm warning is issued. The watch area is typically large, covering numerous counties or even states.

Severe Thunderstorm Warning: Take Action! Severe weather has been reported by spotters or indicated by radar. Warnings indicate imminent danger to life and property. Take shelter in a substantial building. Get out of mobile homes that can blow over in high winds. Warnings typically encompass a much smaller area (around the size of a city or small county) that may be impacted by a large hail or damaging wind identified by an NWS forecaster on radar or by a trained spotter/law enforcement who is watching the storm.

Difference between a tornado watch and warning:

TORNADO defined as a violently rotating column of air that is in contact with the ground. If the circulation is not on the ground, then it is defined as a funnel cloud. Tornadoes usually descend from thunderstorms. Wind speeds in tornadoes can range from 65 mph to 318 mph (the highest tornado wind speed ever recorded). Your safety depends on being constantly aware of the possibility of severe weather.

Tornado WATCH means that conditions are favorable for the development of severe thunderstorms and tornadoes in and close to the watch area. A watch is normally issued for a large area covering numerous counties. The watch is intended to give you time to review your safety rules. The sky may be sunny, but weather changes can take place quite rapidly.

Tornado WARNING means that a developing tornado has been detected by National Weather Service Doppler Radar or has been reported on the ground by reliable sources. A Tornado Warning is typically issued for a portion of counties at a time and usually lasts no more than 45 minutes. If a Tornado Warning is issued for your county, you should seek shelter immediately. If you see a tornado or feel threatened, move to a safe place immediately, as precious seconds can save your life.